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Sporting Opportunities

The St Columban’s College (StC), Caboolture sporting program and opportunities for students are second to none.

These college sporting programs include The Associated Schools (TAS) sports, which include competitive cricket, basketball, tennis, rugby, hockey, netball, touch, volleyball, soccer and carnivals among a number of schools.

Further, students often participate in special competitions and sporting workshops.

This recently happened when college netball players competed in the Vicki Wilson finals.

College sports teacher and coach, Julie Atkins explained the Vicki Wilson Shield competition and sporting in general at the college.

“The program that we run is sporting alongside academics and is just so important,” Ms Atkins said in the video above.

“I find that the younger kids can really reflect on the older kids, and I really try to instil that in our older boys and girls, whatever sport they’re playing – to make sure that they’re being role models for the younger students, but to have those younger students have the ability to play with the older kids, it really makes them go to the next level.

“StC has absolutely everything your kid could possibly ever dream of,” Ms Atkins concluded.

To find out more about St Columban’s College, Caboolture and student sporting opportunities, go to – https://EveryStudentEverySuccess.com.

Video transcript:

We’ve had some massive sporting opportunities for our students, and obviously, very well-deserved sporting opportunities. In the first weekend back of this term, our Vicki Wilson shield team, which is a U-7 to 9 team, they qualified for the Vicki Wilson finals, which is a massive achievement in itself. So, every school in Queensland is eligible to go for that, and every region has its own qualifying finals, and so we obviously qualified for the Sunshine Coast region, coming first in our region and qualified as the top 20 teams in the state to go through the finals.

So, I coach the U9 TAS team this year, and we had an amazing season. It’s a really great journey, and we actually pulled in a couple of great 8s, some really talented great 8s, and a U7 student, which is really fantastic building blocks for the future of our TAS programme. It’s a wonderful journey coaching all of those girls, getting to know them, building them as young women in our college to be resilient and really showing that teamwork that we value so much at the college.

The programme that we run is the sporting side alongside with the academic is just so important. I find that the younger kids can really reflect on the older kids, and I really try to instil that in our older boys and girls, whatever sport they’re playing to make sure that they’re being role models for the younger students, but to have those younger students have the ability to play up with the older kids, it really makes them go to the next level.

Being accountable to your team, so while a netball team might only be anywhere between 8 to 10 to 12 players, it’s also about being accountable to your house, obviously, Duhig House is very close to my heart, but being accountable to the college as well. So, we really try and instil that family atmosphere in all of our kids, whether it’s a sporting team, their pastoral house, or the college. It’s really important to be, and that brings out the resilience, being accountable to each other, and Mrs. Redkit has mentored me so much over the past seven years that I’ve been at the college, and I’ve been really fortunate.

She’s taught me so much about the world of sport, the world of academics, organising those behind the scenes carnivals, and the real impact that we can have as teachers on these kids’ lives. It’s really important, and the high-performance culture is just so important. It’s not only about all our kids participating, but making them accountable and really pushing them to their absolute best.

Last weekend, we were lucky enough to take away two U7 teams who’ve been a really committed bunch of young men and women. So, the U7 boys obviously play TAS in term one, so they’ve had a little bit of a break from TAS, but it was great to really get them back into hitting the ball. The girls have just come off the back of their TAS season, and it’s just going away to a carnival like that, the girls played six games across the three days. The boys played eight. They also have to referee and score and be linespeople, so again, it’s in-building into them that accountability to the team and making sure they’re all a part of it. So, that was Junior Schools Cup at the Gold Coast, and such a great prelude to our TAS season for next year.

STC has absolutely everything your kid could possibly ever dream of. So, we’ve also just the last couple of weeks, we’ve had all-schools touch competition, which is the biggest one, actually, in the Southern Hemisphere. If your kid loves touch, that’s just so amazing. Our netball programme runs virtually all year round. I’ll be starting TAS pre-season actually next week, so we’ll be getting some of those girls back into some fitness training. We’re already running pre-season volleyball. There’ll be pre-season tennis happening, so pretty much any sporting opportunities that your kids really want to come and be a part of, we will provide. We’ve got TAS girls gala soccer coming up this term. There’s rugby 7s. The opportunities are unending. Vanie Pelite, who’s just been named the National Women Rugby Player of the Year is an ex-STC student, was initially introduced to rugby 7s here at STC, so what more opportunities could you really ask for?

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